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Author: Prof. Barb H. Wyman

Poetry Blog

England, Newman’s Admonition

Newman warned England to repent from its pride and rejection of God. In his verses he opened lines with stressed syllables to emphasize his point.

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Poetry Blog

Epiphany-Eve: A Birthday Offering

Newman sees the meaning of his sister’s death as drawing those she left behind into that invisible world, likening it to the star which guided the magi.

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Poetry Blog

Preparing for Christ

Blessed Newman’s poem, “Advent-Lauds,” is a translation of a fifth century hymn that can help us prepare for the coming of our Lord.

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Poetry Blog

The Elements

Newman teaches that faith and reason at the service of God brings man to a deeper appreciation of the complexity of the created world

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Poetry Blog

Faith against Sight

We are called by Newman to scatter wide the seed of the truth of the gospel, living in the world which just like from days of old forgets God.

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Poetry Blog

Consolation

Blessed Cardinal John Henry Newman
Consolation
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True consolation comes from the knowledge that Christ is ever with us.

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Poetry Blog

Transfiguration

Blessed Cardinal John Henry Newman
Transfiguration
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For Newman, God wishes to transform us so that the “the beauty of holiness” may shine through us to others.

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Poetry Blog

The Sign of the Cross

Blessed Cardinal John Henry Newman
The Sign of the Cross
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Newman reminds us of the power of the Cross which opens us to the invisible world and God’s grace.

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Poetry Blog

Solitude

Blessed Cardinal John Henry Newman
Solitude
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In the poem “Solitude,” John Henry Newman reminds us of the importance of silent time alone with God.

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Snapdragon: a Riddle for a Flower Book, Part 2

Blessed Cardinal John Henry Newman
Snapdragon: a Riddle for a Flower Book, Part 2
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These verses are the expression of Newman’s desire to live and die at Oxford, in the simplicity of the life of a scholar, caring for his students.

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